I was walking to somewhere in my neighborhood recently, or more accurately, coming home from having walked to somewhere in my neighborhood, when I saw a curious bumper sticker.

It was an old stationwagon, one that makes me think of the 80’s, though it is more likely from the 90’s. What kind? Well, sort of blue, I’d say. The house at whose curb it is parked is an unassuming and pleasant house, with a porch on which I never see people sit. Of course in this neighborhood they’re either fantastically wealthy (they have a house, after all), or they’ve lived here for a long time. I’m guessing the latter.

The bumpersticker appears to be a campaign bumpersticker. The normal type, some name, some slogan, some year. The year is 2008, and the slogan is “why vote for a lesser evil?”

And this is an interesting thought. Are we ever completely happy with our choices when it comes to elected officials? Or potentially elected officials? I don’t think I am. I might agree with them on certain issues, and be absolutely disappointed, sometimes to the point of disgust, with their stance on other issues. I’m tired of the two-party system, and I think many people would heartily welcome the ability to vote for someone on the basis of their merit, feeling like worthy candidates had a chance, that it was up to the entire body of citizens to have a say, and all that without being told that we were “throwing away our vote.”

As if voting for the “lesser evil” isn’t doing the same, really.

And so the bumper sticker caught my eye. I wasn’t sure, at first, whether it was a joke, or just a candidate I’d never heard of. I saw reference to the name a couple weeks later, as it happens, and that question was answered for me.

election bumper sticker

But was it really a joke? If it was, it was a thought-provoking one, at least for me. And perhaps that’s the point. A dark-humored joke that’s not quite as funny as it could have been, because it hits a bit too close to home.

Well there’s always the ability to write in our candidate of choice, after all.

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